2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog: Courses in English (ENGL)


Course Description Prefixes

Course Description Definitions


ENGL 1101/1102 or ENGL 1103 or their equivalents are prerequisites for all English courses at the 2000-level or above.

 

ENGL 1100. Supplemental Writing for English Language Learners. (3)  Corequisite: ENGL 1101.  Limited to students whose primary language is not English who may need additional support while concurrently enrolled in a designated section of ENGL 1101.  Does not count toward an English major or toward the General Education requirement.  Students may not register for ENGL 1100 before taking the Department of English's placement test for persons whose primary language is not English. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 1101. Writing and Inquiry in Academic Contexts I. (3)  Writing is both the primary subject of inquiry and the primary activity.  Students write, revise, edit and reflect on their writing with the support of the teacher and peers.  Students also engage critically with the opinions and voices of others, as they are encouraged to understand how their writing can have an effect on themselves and their environments.  As the primary subject of readings and discussion, writing is explored as it relates to different contexts, discourses, cultures and textual media.  As students inquire into literacy, they understand their own writing and development with heightened awareness.  Grades are derived primarily from portfolios that include work generated throughout the term.

ENGL 1102. Writing and Inquiry in Academic Contexts II. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 1101.  Students develop an extended inquiry project that integrates materials from varied sources and includes writing in multiple genres.  Students write, revise, edit and reflect on their writing with the support of the teacher and peers.  Students also immerse themselves in a conversation about a topic through reading, questioning, and process writing.  Polished writing might assume the forms of presentations, reviews of research, essayistic arguments, or multi-media and web-based projects.  Students learn to distinguish rhetorical contexts, practice different conventions, and develop positions in relation to research.  They also adopt digital technologies to network, compose, and/or critique and disseminate their work.  Grades are derived primarily from portfolios that include work generated throughout the term.

ENGL 1103. Accelerated College Writing and Rhetoric. (3)  Prerequisite: Placement by the Department of English.  Accelerated writing curriculum that fulfills the requirement for ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102. (Fall)

ENGL 2014. Topics in Writing. (1-3) (W)  Offers instruction and practice in special types of writing, such as research or legal writing, that are not included in other writing courses. In addition, some sections may be designed for students who need strengthening of composition skills, or may offer instruction in various aspects of effective writing. ENGL 2014 may not be used toward the requirements for the English major. The maximum hours of credit allowed are six for ENGL 2014 or 2015, or for 2014 and 2015 together. (On demand)

ENGL 2015. Topics in Writing. (1-3) (W) Offers instruction and practice in special types of writing, such as writing for publication (exclusive of poetry, drama, and fiction), which are not included in other writing courses. In addition, some sections may offer instruction in various aspects of effective writing. Not more than three hours of 2015 may be used toward the requirements for the English major (and those three hours may not be used toward fulfillment of the 12 hours of English language or composition required for licensure in English). The maximum hours of credit allowed for any student are six for ENGL 2015 or 2014, or for 2015 and 2014 together. (On demand)

ENGL 2050. Topics in English. (3) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Does not count toward the English major. (Yearly)

ENGL 2051. Topics in English - Writing Intensive. (3) (W) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Does not count toward the English major. Fulfills General Education writing goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2052. Topics in English - Oral Communication. (3) (O) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Does not count toward the English major. Fulfills General Education oral communication goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2053. Topics in English - Writing Intensive & Oral Communication. (3) (O, W) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Does not count toward the English major. Fulfills General Education writing goal and oral communication goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2090. Topics in English. (3) Special topics not included in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Does not fulfill General Education writing goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2091. Topics in English - Writing Intensive. (3) (W) Special topics not included in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Fulfills General Education writing goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2092. Topics in English - Oral Communication. (3) (O) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Fulfills General Education oral communication goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2093. Topics in English - Writing Intensive & Oral Communication. (3) (O, W) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Fulfills General Education writing goal and oral communication goal. (On demand)

ENGL 2100. Writing About Literature. (3) (W)  Prerequisite: English major or minor, or Education major.  Combined practice in writing and study of literature, emphasizing writing processes including revision. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ENGL 2101. Masterpieces of British Literature I.  (3) An introduction to British Literature written before 1800.  The course also provides backgrounds in the society and culture of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Age of Reason. (On demand)

ENGL 2102. Masterpieces of British Literature II.  (3)  An introduction to masterpieces of British Literature written since 1800.  The course also provides backgrounds in the society and culture of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods. (On demand)

ENGL 2103. Masterpieces of Modern Fiction. (3) Readings in selected novels and short stories written since 1850. (On demand)

ENGL 2104. Major American Writers. (3) Introductory readings in six to eight authors, approximately half from the 19th century and half from the 20th century, both poetry and prose. (On demand)

ENGL 2105. Introduction to Poetry. (3) (W) Representative poems and poets, drawn from several literary periods that introduce students to several poetic genres, to varied treatments of universal themes (such as love, death, disappointment, joy), and to various ideas about poetic imaginations. (Yearly)

ENGL 2106. Film Criticism. (3) Introduction to film as an art form. Emphasis will be on the critical analysis of the form and the content of films with attention to issues of visual narrative, audience, cinematography, editing, acting, etc. (On demand)

ENGL 2107. Literature and Film. (3)  Critical study of the intersections of literature and film.  May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand)

ENGL 2108. Introduction to Drama. (3) (W)  Representative plays of the western world from the classical period to the modern period to introduce students to drama as literature, with consideration of staging, conventions of the theater, types of drama, and dramatic theory. (On demand)

ENGL 2114. Learning Community Seminar. (1)  Educational forum for activities of the English Learning Community. Students will devise and complete assignments relating to their cultural and intellectual activities. Enrollment restricted to students accepted into the English Learning Community; may be repeated for up to three units of credit. Does not count toward the English major. Graded on a Pass/No Credit basis. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 2116. Introduction to Technical Communication. (3) (W)  Technical Communication theory (such as organization, audience analysis, and editing) is taught in the context of oral and written formats, such as memoranda, proposals, reports, PowerPoint presentations, and includes formats and content common to students' own disciplines. (Fall, Spring, Summer) (Evenings)

ENGL 2125. Imagined Worlds: Creative Writing Laboratory. (3)  In an “experimental” classroom laboratory for creative writers, students learn basic methods, theories, terminology, and approaches to the art of creative writing. (Yearly) (Evenings)

ENGL 2126. Introduction to Creative Writing. (3) (W)  Introduction to creative writing, including both poetry and fiction writing, assuming little or no previous creative writing experience. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ENGL 2127. Introduction to Poetry Writing. (3)  An introductory course for those with little experience in reading, writing, and critiquing poetry.  Students read and discuss poetry in an anthology and also be responsible for writing poems based on assigned formal strategies or themes and for bringing them to a workshop setting for group critique. (On demand)

ENGL 2128. Introduction to Fiction Writing. (3)  An introductory course for those with little experience in reading, writing, and critiquing fiction.  Students read and discuss short stories in an anthology and also be responsible for writing stories based on assigned formal strategies or themes and bringing them to a workshop setting for group critique. (On demand)

ENGL 2161. Grammar for Writing. (3)  A systematic, hands-on review of the grammar behind professional copy editing for academic and public submission, including techniques for using sentence structure, word choice, and information management to make texts intuitively appealing without sacrificing precision and to maximize reading speed. (On demand)

ENGL 2200. Contemporary Literature. (3)  Introduction to trends in contemporary literature.  Encourages creativity through scholarly engagement with the world of contemporary literature. (On demand)

ENGL 2201. Contemporary Poetry. (3)  Introduction to current trends in American and world poetry.  Encourages creativity and scholarly engagement with the exciting and multifaceted world of contemporary poetry. (On demand)

ENGL 2202. Contemporary Fiction. (3)  Introduction to current trends in contemporary fiction.  Encourages creative and scholarly engagement with the world of contemporary fiction. (On demand)

ENGL 2301. Introduction to African-American Literature. (3)  Cross-listed as AFRS 2301.  Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102;  or ENGL 1103; or departmental permission.  Survey of the major periods, texts, and issues in African-American literature.  Prerequisite to 4000 level African-American literature courses in Department of English. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 2400. American Literature Survey. (3)  Surveys the whole of American literature from the Colonial  to the Modern period.  Major authors and literary movements, as well as important ideas and cultural issues are addressed. (Yearly)

ENGL 2401. British Literature Survey I. (3)  Surveys British literature from the Medieval period to the Renaissance.  Major authors and literary movements as well as important ideas and cultural issues are addressed.  (On demand)

ENGL 2402. British Literature Survey II. (3)  Surveys British literature from the Neoclassical to the Modern period.  Major authors and literary movements, as well as important ideas and cultural issues are addressed.  (On demand)

ENGL 2403. British Literature Survey. (3)  British literature from the Medieval period to the present.  Major authors and literary movements as well as important ideas and cultural issues are addressed.  (Yearly)

ENGL 3050. Topics in English. (3)  Special topics not included in other courses.  May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand)

ENGL 3051. Topics in English - Writing Intensive. (3) (W)  Special topics not included in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (On demand)

ENGL 3052. Topics in English - Oral Communication. (3) (O)  Offers topics of general interest not included in other courses.  May be repeated for additional credit with department approval. (On demand)

ENGL 3053. Topics in English - Writing Intensive and Oral Communication. (3) (O, W)  Offers topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with department approval. (On demand)

ENGL 3100. Approaches to Literature. (3) (W)  Introductory study and application of major critical approaches to literature, such as historical, psychological, mythological, and formalistic. (Fall, Spring, Summer) (Evenings)

ENGL 3102. Literature for Young Children. (3)  Critical study of literature for children under the age of eight, covering such topics as picture books, nursery rhymes, and books for beginning readers. (Spring)

ENGL 3103. Children’s Literature. (3)  Critical study of various genres of children’s literature, such as realistic fiction, fantasy, and picture books. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 3104. Literature for Adolescents (3) Critical study of literature intended for adolescent and pre-adolescent readers, as well as texts that deal with coming-of-age themes. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 3132. Introduction to Contemporary American English. (3)  Introduction to the study of word formation, the sound system, and the structure of contemporary American English, including characteristics and applications of traditional grammar. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 3157. Twentieth Century Black American Literature:  Prose. (3)  Intensive study of selected black American 20th century writers of fiction and nonfiction, beginning with the Harlem Renaissance. (Alternate years)

ENGL 3158. Gender and African-American Literature. (3)  Cross-listed as AFRS 3158.  Exploration of the intersection of gender and African-American literature, focusing on either Black women writers or Black male writers, or a combination in dialogue. (Alternate years)

ENGL 3159. African-American Poetry. (3)  Cross-listed as AFRS 3159.  Intensive study of African-American poetry, focusing on one period or traversing several. (Alternate years)

ENGL 3162. Language and the Virtual World. (3)  Explores the various ways in which language is used in cyberspace, and how those practices are re-shaping our daily lives and our cultural expectations. (Yearly)

ENGL 3180. Language and Digital Technology. (3)  Rhetorical, psychological, and anthropological theories that underscore the interrelations of written, graphic, and digital communication within technical, rhetorical contexts. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 3201. Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2127, ENGL 2128, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, or ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Workshop combines the reading and discussion of published poetry with the writing of original creative works. (Yearly)

ENGL 3202. Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2127, ENGL 2128, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, or ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Workshop combines the reading and discussion of published fiction with the writing of original creative works. (Yearly)

ENGL 3211. Medieval Literature. (3)  Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the Medieval era. (On demand)

ENGL 3212. British Renaissance Literature. (3)  Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the 16th and/or 17th centuries. (On demand)

ENGL 3213. British Literature of the Restoration and 18th Century. (3)  Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the Restoration and/or 18th century. (On demand)

ENGL 3214. Romantic British Literature, 1785-1832. (3)  Literature from the Romantic period, with emphasis on the works of specific writers, which may include works by men and women writers such as Wordsworth, Blake, Coleridge, Wollstonecraft, Austen, and Smith. (On demand)

ENGL 3215. British Victorian Literature. (3)  Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the Victorian era. (On demand)

ENGL 3216. British Literature in Transition, 1870-1914. (3)  Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the period 1870-1914. (On demand)

ENGL 3217. Modern British Literature. (3)  Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the 20th and 21st centuries. (On demand)

ENGL 3231. Early African-American Literature. (3)  Exploration of the major periods, texts, and issues in African-American literature from its origins to the Harlem Renaissance. (On demand)

ENGL 3232. Early American Literature. (3)  Origins of American literature, from Colonial times to Washington Irving, including such authors as Edwards, Taylor, Franklin, Crevecoeur, Freneau, and Brown. (On demand)

ENGL 3233. American Literature of the Romantic Period. (3)  Important writers and ideas of the period of American romanticism, from Irving through Whitman, including such authors as Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. (On demand)

ENGL 3234. American Literature of the Realist and Naturalist Periods. (3)  Important writers and ideas of American literature, from Whitman through the period of World War I, including such authors as Dickinson, Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dreiser, and Frost.  (On demand)

ENGL 3235. Modern American Literature. (3)  Representative American literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the 20th and 21st centuries.  (On demand)

ENGL 3236. African-American Literature, Harlem Renaissance to Present. (3)  Exploration of the major periods, texts, and issues in African-American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. (On demand)

ENGL 3237. Modern and Recent U.S. Multiethnic Literature. (3)  Representative U.S. multiethnic texts (poetry and/or prose) exemplifying the literary and cultural developments of the 20th and 21st centuries.  (On demand)

ENGL 3267. Vocabulary, Etymology, and Grammar. (3)  Theoretical and practical exploration of vocabulary, etymology, and grammar for applications in teaching, writing, and editing in professional and technical arenas. (On demand)

ENGL 3852. Independent Study. (1-3)  Prerequisite: Permission of the department.  Individual investigations and appropriate exposition of the results.  (Unless special permission is granted by the department chair, no more than six hours of ENGL 3852 may apply toward the English major.)  (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ENGL 4002. Women and Literature. (3) Selected topics focusing on women and literature, such as images of women, women as writers, and women as literary critics. With permission of the Department of English, may be repeated for credit as topics vary. (However, only six hours may be used for the requirements for the English major.) (On demand)

ENGL 4008. Topics in Advanced Technical Communication. (3) Prerequisites: ENGL 2116 and COMM 1101. Exploration, both theoretically and practically, of the interrelation of written, oral, graphic, and digital communication within technical rhetorical contexts. May be repeated once for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. (On demand)

ENGL 4050. Topics in English. (3) Special topics not included in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Does not fulfill General Education writing goal. (On demand)

ENGL 4051. Topics in English - Writing Intensive. (3) (W) Special topics not included in other courses. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Fulfills General Education writing goal. (On demand)

ENGL 4052. Topics in English - Oral Communication. (3) (O) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. Fulfills General Education oral communication goal. (On demand)

ENGL 4053. Topics in English - Writing Intensive & Oral Communication. (3) (O, W) Designed to offer topics of general interest not included in other courses. May be repeated for additional credit with the approval of the Department of English. May be used as an elective toward the English major. Fulfills General Education writing goal and oral communication goal. (On demand)

ENGL 4061. Approaches to Discourse. (3)  Provides tools to understand and analyze discourse and pragmatics in order to analyze genres belonging to various discourse systems such as theater plays, classroom interaction, religious ritual, courtroom interaction, therapy sessions, and service encounters. (On demand)

ENGL 4090. Major Authors. (3)  The works, ideas, and life of one to three significant authors. With permission of the Department of English, may be repeated once for credit as long as different authors are considered. (On demand)

ENGL 4102. British Children’s Literature. (3)  Focuses on works in British and British Colonial Children’s literature.  May be repeated for credit as topics vary.  (Fall)

ENGL 4103. American Children’s Literature. (3)  Focuses on works in American Children’s literature.  May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Spring)

ENGL 4104. Multiculturalism and Children’s Literature. (3)  Focuses on works that represent one or more kinds of cultural, ethnic, or social diversity of the United States and other national literatures.  May be repeated for credit as topics vary. (Fall)

ENGL 4111. Ancient World Literature.  (3) Readings of ancient world literature, in English translation. (On demand)

ENGL 4112. Modern World Literature. (3) Readings in modern world literature, in English and in English translation. (On demand)

ENGL 4114. Milton. (3) A study of the major poems and selections from the minor works of Milton. (On demand)

ENGL 4116. Shakespeare's Early Plays. (3) A study of 10 representative plays from the comedies, histories, and tragedies written 1590-1600. (Yearly)

ENGL 4117. Shakespeare's Late Plays. (3) A study of 10 representative plays from the period 1600-1611, including the late tragedies and tragi-comedies. (Yearly)

ENGL 4118. British Renaissance Literature. (3) Readings of prose, poetry, and/or drama from the Renaissance period in England (16th and 17th centuries), which may include works by men and women writers such as Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, Lanyer, Wroth, and others. (On demand)

ENGL 4120. Romantic British Literature, 1785-1832. (3) Literature from the Romantic period, with emphasis on the works of specific writers, which may include works by men and women writers such as Wordsworth, Blake, Coleridge, Wollstonecraft, Austen, and Smith. (On demand)

ENGL 4121. British Literature of the Restoration and 18th Century. (3) Representative poetry, prose, and/or drama from this period in British literary history, which may include works by men and women writers such as Pope, Dryden, Sheridan, Behn, Centlivre, and others. (On demand)

ENGL 4122. British Victorian Literature. (3)  Readings in British literature during the Victorian period in England.Texts studiedmay include selections from poetry, prose, and/or drama and men and women writers such as Dickens, Browning, Tennyson, Bronte, Eliot, and Wilde. (On demand)

ENGL 4123. Modern British Literature. (3) Representative British literary texts (poetry, prose, and/or drama) that embody the cultural and literary developments of the 20th century. (On demand)

ENGL 4132. British Drama to 1642, Excluding Shakespeare. (3) A survey of late-medieval and Renaissance drama in England. (On demand)

ENGL 4139. Early American Literature. (3) Origins of American literature, from Colonial times to Washington Irving, including such authors as Edwards, Taylor, Franklin, Crevecoeur, Freneau, Brown.  (On demand)

ENGL 4140. American Literature of the Romantic Period. (3) Important writers and ideas of the period of American romanticism, from Irving through Whitman, including such authors as Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville. (On demand)

ENGL 4141. American Literature of the Realist and Naturalist Periods. (3) Important writers and ideas of American literature, from Whitman through the period of World War I, including such authors as Dickinson, Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Dreiser, Frost. (On demand)

ENGL 4142. Modern American Literature. (3)  Important writers and ideas of modern American literature, including such authors as Faulkner, Eliot, Hemingway, Cummings.  (On demand)

ENGL 4145. Literature of the American South. (3) Selected works of Southern writers that reflect literary and cultural concerns from Colonial times to the present, including such authors as Poe, the early humorists, local color writers, Chopin, Faulkner, Warren, O'Connor, Welty. (Yearly)

ENGL 4150. Poetry. (3) Poetry written in English, focusing on a particular period, nationality, or topic. With permission of the Department of English, may be repeated once for credit as topics vary. (On demand)

ENGL 4151. Drama. (3) Drama written in English, focusing on a particular period, nationality, or topic. With permission of the Department of English, may be repeated once for credit as topics vary. (On demand)

ENGL 4153. Fiction. (3) Fiction written in English, focusing on a particular period, nationality, or topic. With permission of the Department of English, may be repeated once for credit as topics vary. (On demand)

ENGL 4155. Pan-African Literature. (3) Introduction to significant Pan-African literature, emphasizing the oral tradition, selected works of major authors in the Caribbean and Africa, and the relationships of these traditions to American, British and other literary traditions. Works not originally written in English will be studied in translation. (On demand)

ENGL 4160. Origins of Language. (3)  Study of linguistic theories of how and when human language developed, with attention to parallel work in anthropology, archeology, and psychology. (On demand)

ENGL 4161. Modern English Grammar. (3) A study of the structure of contemporary English, with an emphasis on descriptive approaches. (On demand)

ENGL 4165. Multiculturalism and Language. (3)  Readings in and discussion and application of the interrelationships between language and culture, including basic introduction to contemporary American dialects and to social contexts of language. (Yearly)

ENGL 4167. The Mind and Language. (3)  Introduction to the study of the mind from a linguistic perspective.  Topics include: language growth and loss, language deficits, modularity and hierarchical processing, the interaction of cognitive and linguistic faculties, parsing/processing strategies and limitations, and applications such as therapy, forensics, computing, teaching.  (Alternate years)

ENGL 4168. Multimodality and Text Description. (3)  Explores how different modes of communication interact and are integrated in adapted, new or emergent digital discourses and genres.  Multimodal analysis includes the analysis of communication in all its forms, but is particularly concerned with texts in which two or more semiotic resources–or ‘modes’ of communication–are integrated and combined.  Such resources include aspects of speech such as intonation and other vocal characteristics, gesture (face, hand, and body) and proxemics, as well as products of human technology such as carving, painting, writing, architecture, image, sound recording, and interactive computing resources. (Yearly)

ENGL 4181. Writing and Designing User Documents. (3)  Researching and analyzing audiences to write publishable instructions.  Includes the production, testing, and revision of tutorials, reference manuals, on-line documents, and digital media for users of computers and other technologies. (On demand)

ENGL 4182. Information Design and Digital Publishing. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2116.  Theoretical and practical exploration of visual communication.  By rhetorically integrating text and graphics, students write and publish documents and online content for digital environments. (Yearly)

ENGL 4183. Editing with Digital Technologies. (3)  Substantive editing, copyediting, project management, and editing in hardcopy documents and web and digital environments. (Yearly)

ENGL 4200. Teaching of Writing. (3) (W)  Introduction to various theories that inform practices in the teaching of writing and methods of teaching writing to middle and secondary learners. (Yearly)

ENGL 4201. Teaching of Multi-Ethnic Literature. (3) (W)  An overview of the issues, opportunities, and challenges of teaching multi-ethnic literature in middle and secondary school settings. (Yearly)

ENGL 4202. Writing Poetry. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2127, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Further study of and practice in the writing of poetry within a workshop format.  May be repeated once for credit with the permission of department. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings)

ENGL 4203. Writing Fiction. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2128, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Further study of and practice in the writing of fiction within a workshop format.  May be repeated once for credit with the permission of department. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings)

ENGL 4204. Expository Writing. (3) (W) Writing of essays, criticism, and various forms of exposition. (Fall, Spring) (Evenings)

ENGL 4206. Writing Creative Nonfiction. (3) (W)  Prerequisites: English major or minor; and ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2127, ENGL 2128, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, or ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Combines the reading and discussion of published creative nonfiction with the writing of original creative works. (On demand)

ENGL 4208. Poetry Writing Workshop. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2127, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Designed for advanced writers of poetry. Focuses primarily on student work and peer criticism of it.  May be repeated once for credit with permission of department. (Yearly)

ENGL 4209. Fiction Writing Workshop. (3)  Prerequisite: ENGL 2125, ENGL 2126, ENGL 2128, ENGL 2200, ENGL 2201, ENGL 2202, or permission of instructor.  Designed for advanced writers of fiction.  Focuses primarily on student work and peer criticism of it.  May be repeated once for credit with permission of department. (Yearly)

ENGL 4211. Chaucer and Medieval Literature. (3) Readings that focus on the works of Chaucer, including The Canterbury Tales, and other works from the medieval period in England, which may include Troilus and Crisedye and various dramatic texts. (On demand)

ENGL 4235. History of the Book. (3)  Explorations of the development, technologies, cultures, and impact of the book and print media. (On demand)  

ENGL 4254. Teaching English/Communication Skills to Middle and Secondary School Learners. (3)  Prerequisite: Senior English major with a secondary education minor; senior middle grades major, or permission of the department.  Approaches to the teaching of English, including recent theories and research related to writing and literary study, with special attention to technology. Designed primarily for teaching in grades 6-12. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 4260. History of Global Englishes. (3)  Origins and development of the English language, both spoken and written, from its earliest forms to contemporary usage. (Yearly)

ENGL 4262. Language and Diversity. (3)  Examination of contemporary American varieties of English by region, gender, ethnic identity, socio-economic status, age, social networks, and other cultural groupings. (On demand)

ENGL 4263. Linguistics and Language Learning. (3)  Readings in, discussions of, and application of linguistically oriented theories of language acquisition, directed toward gaining an understanding of language-learning processes and stages. (Alternate years)

ENGL 4267. Identity, Social Interaction, and Community in Digital Spaces. (3)  Explores how humans make cyberspace into social space through language practices in online communities.  Considers as well how technology use shapes and is shaped in social interaction and how identities, relationships, discourses, and communities develop through digitally-mediated language use. (Yearly)

ENGL 4270. Studies in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy. (3) (W)  Studies of writing, rhetoric, and literacy with an emphasis on historical and cultural contexts. (On demand)

ENGL 4271. Studies in Writing, Rhetoric, and New Media. (3) (W)  Studies of writing, rhetoric, and new media and digital technologies with an emphasis on historical and cultural contexts. (On demand)

ENGL 4272. Studies in the Politics of Language and Writing. (3) (W)  Explores language and writing as sites of political contestation in local, national, and global contexts.  Examines theoretical debates and effects of politics and history on language and learning. (On demand)

ENGL 4273. Studies in Writing, Rhetoric, and Identity. (3) (W)  Explores how identities are performed in textual and digital media. (On demand)

ENGL 4274. Visual Rhetoric. (3) (W)  Theory and practice of crafting rhetorical arguments in print and electronic media that depend upon visual exhibits, such as drawings, photographs, tables, graphs, icons, and videos. (On demand)

ENGL 4275. Rhetoric and Technology. (3) (W)  Research and theories of the rhetorical construction of technology in history and culture. (On demand)

ENGL 4277. Digital Literacies. (3)  Exploration of the intersections between evolving digital literacies and traditional school-based literacies. (On demand)

ENGL 4290. Advanced Creative Project. (3) (O)  Prerequisites: English major or minor; and ENGL 4202, ENGL 4203, ENGL 4208, ENGL 4209, or permission of instructor.  Focuses on the planning of a book-length work of creative writing through independent study and scholarly engagement in related areas of contemporary literature and writing, leading to the development of book proposals, abstracts, discussions of creative works, and oral presentations by students and authors. (On demand)

ENGL 4400. Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing. (1-3) (W) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Through supervised tutorial experience and seminars, this course introduces the student to current developments concerning composition and to a variety of methods for teaching English composition.  Highly recommended for those planning to teach or those currently engaged in teaching.  May be repeated once for credit with permission of department.  (Fall)

ENGL 4405. Literacy and Language. (3)  Exploration of how language and literacy can be effectively taught to adolescents. Topics include: composing strategies and the effects of new media on literacy practices. (Fall, Spring)

ENGL 4410. Professional Internship. (3 or 6) Prerequisites: Permission of English Internship Coordinator; Junior or Senior status; English major or minor, or Minor in Technical/Professional Writing; 2.5 GPA or above; and taken a course in professional communication (e.g., journalism, technical communication, public relations, public relations lab, or mass media).  Students work 8-10 hours (3 hours credit) or 16-20 hours (6 hours credit) per week in a placement arranged by the Internship Coordinator.  May be repeated once for credit: only three credit hours may be applied to the English major; three additional hours may be counted as a University elective. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

ENGL 4852. Independent Study. (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of department.  Individual investigations and appropriate exposition of the results. (Unless special permission is granted by the department chair, no more than six hours may apply toward the English major.)  May be repeated for additional credit with approval of the Department of English. (Fall, Spring, Summer)